Harold Feldman

Harold Feldman


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Harold Feldman was born in 1919. He worked as a freelance writer and translator. During the 1930s he was a translator for the Social Security Administration. Feldman contributed a large number of articles to psychoanalytic journals. His brother-in-law, Vincent J. Salandria, has argued: "Harold was a brilliant thinker and a revolutionary one. He was willing to oppose power and to seek justice for the powerless."

Feldman and Salandria were shocked by the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Salandria became suspicious when the media reported that Lee Harvey Oswald had previously defected to the Soviet Union, had formed a chapter of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee in New Orleans and was a member of the ACLU. "I began to examine the post-assassination events as they unfolded. I took note of the reports coming in about the alleged assassin. I wondered whether his alleged left-wing credentials were bona fide. Very early in my work in the peace movement, I learned that some ostensible peace activists were infiltrating government agent provocateurs who were not what they at first blush appeared to be." Salandria later commented: "It was apparent to me that no legitimate leftist straddles so many diverse political fences in a factionalized American left." Salandria came to the conclusion that Oswald was a U.S. intelligence agent.

Feldman discussed the case with Salandria on Saturday 23rd November, 1963. Feldman like Salandria, believed Oswald was innocent. Nearly 20 years previously he had published an article on the psychology of assassins entitled The Hero as Assassin . "He has denied his guilt consistently, which no other lone assassin in history had ever done. They usually brag about it." Feldman added: "Look, Oswald will probably be killed. And they'll get a Jew to do it, because they always involve a Jew in these things." Salandria replied: "If Oswald is killed this weekend by a Jew, then we must look for a WASP conspiracy."

John Kelin has pointed out in his book, Praise from a Future Generation (2007): "Feldman and Salandria agreed that a Jewish killer would frighten the Left, and dampen the interests of normally left-leaning Jews in thinking critically about the assassination. Moreover, they both felt that the assassination could not be honestly probed by the government."

After the killing of Lee Harvey Oswald by Jack Ruby, Feldman and Salandria "clipped and collated the multitude of articles on the assassination that were appearing in the nation's press". This included an article by Joseph C. Goulden, a former counter-intelligence agent, reported in the Philadelphia Inquirer, on 8th December, 1963, that alleged that "the Federal Bureau of Investigation tried to recruit Oswald as an undercover informant in Castro groups" two months before the assassination.

On 1st January, 1964, Alonzo (Lonnie) Hudkins in The Houston Post, also speculated that Oswald was closely connected to the FBI. As Feldman later pointed out: "Hudkins found that Oswald did know agent Hosty. He had Hosty’s home phone, office phone and car license number - this on the authority of William Alexander, assistant to Henry Wade, Dallas District Attorney. Alexander had attended the grilling of Oswald on November 22 and 23. Hudkins notes that if the FBI had Oswald under surveillance, the watch could not have been too close or they would have known about the rifle and other matters."

This created a stir at the Warren Commission and Leon Jaworski was sent to interview Hudkins. Jaworski reported back to the commission that Hudkins had invented the story. However, when Hudkins was interviewed by the Secret Service several months later, he said his source was Allan Sweatt, the head of the criminal division of the Dallas Sheriff's Office. According to Harold Weisberg , Sweatt told him that Oswald was an FBI employee with a known number getting $200.00 a month.

On 6th January 1964 Carey McWilliams, the editor of The Nation, rejected Feldman's article on the assassination, Oswald and the FBI. McWilliams told Feldman: "I have decided - most reluctantly, I must confess - not to use your piece. It is certainly a well-done job, and I was sorely tempted, but it seems to me that on balance and for a variety of reasons we should not use it at this time." However, he changed his mind and it appeared later that month. McWilliams commented: "We have made some cuts, but I think they are all to the good."

Feldman started the article with the following words: "The Warren Commission should, if possible, tell us how President Kennedy was killed, who killed him, and why. But beyond that, it must tell us if the FBI or any other government intelligence agency was in any way connected with the alleged assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. At this moment, the possibility of such associations in the young man’s life is intolerably a subject for speculation." Feldman then went on to discuss the information reported by Michael Paine, Joseph C. Goulden and Alonzo (Lonnie) Hudkins.

Feldman argued: "Was the alleged assassin of President Kennedy employed by the FBI? We have seen a news report that the agency tried to recruit him and that it has refused to say whether he accepted the offer. At present, all we know is that his history, as we have been able to piece it together, is not inconsistent with such employment. Indeed, his financial record seems entirely unexplainable unless we make some such hypothesis."

In the same issue of the magazine, Carey McWilliams suggested he did not consider Feldman's theory believable. He also argued the appointment of J. Lee Rankin and Norman Redlich indicated that the Warren Commission would get to the truth: "These are excellent lawyers, men of the highest integrity." McWilliams also gave his support to the report when it was published: "In our view, then, the commission did its work well; the report is an admirable document, and the Chief Justice, his associates and the staff merit the praise they have received. The report should terminate the wilder speculations and more irresponsible rumor-mongering, but it will not do so. We have had occasion to experience, with more sadness than surprise, the depth and pervasiveness of the will to believe (notably among Left-of-Center groups) that the President’s assassination was the result of a sinister conspiracy - the names of the conspirators to be filled in as need, fancy and bias dictate."

In June 1964, Feldman, Vincent J. Salandria and Shirley Martin went to Dallas to visit Helen Markham, the only witness who saw the actual shooting of J. D. Tippit. She refused to talk to them and she reported the visit to the FBI. According to their report on 24th July: "She (Markham) stated she was frightened and did not desire to talk with Mrs. Oswald and the two alleged reporters since she regarded Mrs. Oswald as a mean appearing person."

They also visited the home of Ruth Paine. Her husband, Michael Paine made comments that suggested he had been informed about the background of Salandria: "Why are you working on the assassination? Why don't you stick to your work in civil liberties and civil rights?" Vincent J. Salandria later told Sylvia Meagher: "Michael Paine advised us under questioning of a cross-examination nature, that Oswald was serving as a spy in right-wing organizations." Based on their discussions, Salandria concluded that Paine knew Lee Harvey Oswald much better than his Warren Commission testimony suggested.

Feldman and Salandria also interviewed Acquilla Clemons who had also seen the events around the killing of Tippit . Salandria later recalled: "I thought she was entirely credible." According to Clemons the gunman was a "short guy and kind of heavy". The other man was tall and thin in khaki trousers and a white shirt. The Dallas Police warned her not to repeat this story to others or "she might get hurt".

While they were visiting Dealey Plaza they were approached by a man who made it clear that he knew who they were. Salandria commented that this was probably connected to the comments made by Michael Paine: "The only plausible explanation was that the killers were advertising to me that my efforts to maintain a low profile in the case were unsuccessful. They were also telling me that I could no longer trust my most loving friends. They were instructing me that I could no longer trust my most loving friends. They were instructing me that I was being watched by the agents of the killers. They were advising me that I had a safe haven, if I gave up the assassination work and continued in my American Civil Liberties Union work... they were transparently advertising to me that they had great power, and that I had none."

On the way back they visited Marguerite Oswald, who was living in Fort Worth. It was noted that she seemed to be living in improved circumstances. Vincent J. Salandria reported: "Shirley Martin told me that Marguerite had received money from good people who were interested in her welfare". Martin later commented: "If Marguerite was bought off because she needed money, she did it deliberately, and used the money, and didn't change her thinking one iota."

In March 1965 Feldman published Fifty-One Witnesses: The Grassy Knoll in the Minority of One journal. He argued: "The human ear does not provide the best evidence in a murder case. But its perceptions are evidence not to be despised or dismissed, especially when the case is the murder of a President and more than half of all recorded witnesses agree. What follows is the result of a survey of the 121 witnesses to the assassination of President Kennedy whose statements are registered in the twenty-six volumes appended to the Warren Report. On the question of where the shots that killed the President came from, 38 could give no clear opinion and 32 thought they came from the Texas School Book Depository Building (TSBDB). Fifty-one held the shots sounded as if the came from west of the Depository, the area of the grassy knoll on Elm Street, the area directly on the right of the President's car when the bullets struck."

In October 1967, M. S. Arnoni wrote an article criticising Jim Garrison in the Minority of One. Garrison replied to these points in a letter published in the next issue: "I really do not care greatly whether anybody thinks I am wrong or right about the assassination. Since I happen to be right, the problem is theirs and not mine." Feldman came to Garrison's defence: "If Garrison's case deserves any skepticism, it must be a benevolent skepticism. You cited the fake leads, which were being foisted on the critics a few months ago with the probable intention of misleading and discrediting them. One obvious difference between such leads and Garrison's work is that he has, undoubtedly, and unerringly, located the plot to kill Kennedy in its actual locales and its evident milieus. Another difference is that Garrison has bet his life on the outcome."

Feldman eventually dropped his interest in the assassination of John F. Salandria, later commented : "Harold was crucial in helping me think about the assassination of President Kennedy and to use this understanding as a prism through which I would better examine and gain insights into the nature of the society."

Harold Feldman died of liver cancer in August, 1986.

The Warren Commission should, if possible, tell us how President Kennedy was killed, who killed him, and why. At this moment, the possibility of such associations in the young man’s life is intolerably a subject for speculation.

On the day after the assassination, the Dallas Chief of Police complained on television that the FBI had interviewed Oswald about a week earlier and had failed to inform the Dallas authorities of this fact - something the bureau would normally do after making contact with a suspicious Red. Drew Pearson also reported this but added, “In Washington, the FBI denied that they had interrogated Oswald recently.” However, Michael Paine, who with his wife helped take care of Mrs. Oswald and the two children, “claimed that FBI agents had visited Oswald more than one time after he returned to Dallas from a trip to Mexico City.” Oswald returned to Dallas from Mexico City on October 3, 1963. This report is also contradicted by another:

The FBI picked up the trail again in Dallas after Oswald’s return there on Oct. 3. He was not interviewed, but agents checked twice with Mrs. Ruth Paine, who told them that Oswald had gone to work on Oct. 16 in the Texas State School Book Depository. (The New York Times, 12/10/63.)

The Minority of One (January, 1964) tells us: "William M. Kline, Chief of the U.S. Customs Bureau investigative services in Laredo, Texas, stated on November 25 that Oswald’s movements were watched at the request of “a federal agency in Washington.” (New York Post, November 25.) Eugene Pugh, U.S. agent in charge of the Customs office on the American side of the bridge at Laredo, Texas, said that Oswald had been checked by American immigration officials on entering and leaving Mexico. Mr. Pugh admitted to the New York Herald Tribune that this was “not the usual” procedure. He said Americans were not required to check in with Immigration when crossing the border, “but U.S. immigration has a folder on Oswald’s trip.”

One thing is clear: the FBI was in fairly constant touch with Oswald’s activities. How far these contacts went is indicted in “the revelation that the Federal Bureau of Investigation tried to recruit Oswald as an undercover informant in Castro groups two months before Mr. Kennedy’s death.”

On January 1, Lonnie Hudkins of the Houston Post, published a story under the headline: “Oswald Rumored as Informant for U.S.” Hudkins found that Oswald did know agent Hosty. Hudkins notes that if the FBI had Oswald under surveillance, the watch could not have been too close or they would have known about the rifle and other matters; but, as a sheriff deputy put it, “you just wouldn’t think to check out one of your own stoolies.” Hudkins quotes Wade, himself a former FBI agent, as saying” “It may be true, but I don’t think it will ever be made public if it is.”

What the public hears of the FBI’s part in the Oswald case is usually a report that such and such a witness or authority has been asked, or ordered, to keep his mouth shut. Thus, Dr. J. Humes of the Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., the man who conducted the autopsy on the President, seemed to be the best authority on the exact angle of entry of the murder bullets, but “Dr. Humes said he had been forbidden to talk.” A thirty-four-year-old machinist named Malcolm Howard Price said he had looked through the telescopic sight of Oswald’s rifle on a rifle range in suburban Dallas - but “Mr. Price declined to answer further questions because, he said, the FBI had asked him not to talk. The FBI here (Dallas) denied this.” (The New York Times, 10th December)....

It is in the light of this official coyness that we must consider the possible connection of Oswald with the attempted shooting of General Walker. Oswald’s widow is said to have declared that he boasted of shooting at that doughty warrior. In view of her prolonged seclusion from the public, and even from relatives, under government supervision, we must infer that any statement alleged to be hers at this time is a deliberate “leak.” It is interesting that a similar “leak” at the beginning of the case - that a rifle which Mrs. Oswald knew her husband had kept in a garage was missing on the morning of the assassination - proved to be false. The FBI is also reported to have found a document in Oswald’s handwriting that mentions his attack on Walker, but once again the document has not been produced for examination or reproduced in the press.

Incidentally, if “the loner” did try to shoot General Walker, we would be again confronted with questions like those raised about the killing of the President. “At the time of the Walker shooting,” we read in the Philadelphia Inquirer of December 7, “Dallas police reported that the bullet was from a .30-06 caliber rifle. The weapon used to kill Mr. Kennedy was a 6.5 millimeter weapon, equivalent to about .270 caliber.” Moreover, an eyewitness in the walker affair informed police that he saw at least two men enter the getaway car after the shooting. (Oswald never learned to drive a car.)

Was the alleged assassin of President Kennedy employed by the FBI? We have seen a news report that the agency tried to recruit him and that it has refused to say whether he accepted the offer. Indeed, his financial record seems entirely unexplainable unless we make some such hypothesis.

If there is anything constant in Oswald’s life, it is his need of money. After three years on a marine private’s pay, he goes to Russia. There he works in a factory for the pittance of 80 rubles a month. He returns to America with a wife and child in mid-1962 and thenceforward works at a series of jobs paying the legal minimum wage or less - when he is not unemployed. For months his only acknowledged source of income is the Texas unemployment compensation of $33 a week. His job at the School Book Depository, from whose warehouse he is supposed to have shot the President and Governor Connally, paid him $1.25 an hour.

Surely he was a pauper, a fellow whose monetary resources could only keep him swinging between want and destitution. But if there is another thing about Lee Oswald as certain as his indigence, it is that he was often capable of expenditures that would have cramped the purse of a suburban status seeker.

After years of subsisting on a marine’s pay, from which he occasionally sent money to his mother, he undertakes a trip to Russia with a capital of $1,600. How could he have put aside this nest egg? After years of low factory remuneration in the Soviet, he wants to return to the United States and, in a letter to his mother, estimates the cost at $800. He borrows $435.71 from the United States Embassy in Moscow but, mirabile dictu, he repays the loan between October, 1962, and January, 1962, during which time he was unemployed for several weeks and worked for a time as an unskilled developer of photostatic prints.

A Miss Pauline Bates, public stenographer, whom Oswald paid for typing his notes for a book about Russia three days after his return, has said that “he hinted he had gone to the Soviet as a U.S. secret agent.” He allegedly told her then that “when the State Department granted my visa, they stipulated they could not stand behind me in any way,” an admonition suggestive of instruction, to an undercover man.

Back in America, as impecunious as ever, he finds the money to rent an office for $30 a month, where he sets up in business as the Fair Play for Cuba Committee. He buys a rubber stamp, he prints 2,000 leaflets, he pays a $10 court fine, he buys a rifle and telescopic sight by mail, gets them assembled and bore-sighted - and in his room after his arrest the police find $150. This young man, untalented, it appears, for anything but finding odd windfalls of money, goes to Mexico City for a week to get visas for a trip to Cuba and Russia that would have cost at least $1,000. (The Cuban and Russian consulates did not issue the visas.) After the murder of the President, the police find in his room, in addition to the wad of money, “several expensive cameras and rolls of film.”

Where did the money come from? The FBI and the Dallas police fail to supply information on the subject. For the Russian period, we have the unsupported assertion of Pravda that Oswald was an American spy who made numerous contacts with the American Embassy. This might indicate a CIA affiliation. He wrote his mother that, on his return, he would spend a day or so in New York and Washington for “sightseeing.” After that, all is dark except for one hint. An Associated Press dispatch of November 30 from Dallas says in part: “Someone telegraphed small amounts of money to Lee Harvey Oswald for several months before the assassination of President Kennedy, it was reported today,” the Dallas Times Herald said. The unidentified sender telegraphed Oswald $10 to $20 at a time.

Here apparently are some of the Western Union items about which the FBI has been so secretive - but why this secrecy? If the money came from the Communist Party, it is hard to understand why the FBI should cooperate in a Bolshevik plot. If it came from a right-wing or Fascist source, the FBI could not lose much by revealing it. But if the money came from a government source, then the agency’s reticence is understandable.

The human ear does not provide the best evidence in a murder case. But its perceptions are evidence not to be despised or dismissed, especially when the case is the murder of a President and more than half of all recorded witnesses agree.

What follows is the result of a survey of the 121 witnesses to the assassination of President Kennedy whose statements are registered in the twenty-six volumes appended to the Warren Report.[1] On the question of where the shots that killed the President came from, 38 could give no clear opinion and 32 thought they came from the Texas School Book Depository Building (TSBDB). Fifty-one held the shots sounded as if the came from west of the Depository, the area of the grassy knoll on Elm Street, the area directly on the right of the President's car when the bullets struck.

We begin by conceding what the President's Commission says it found, namely, that a man on the sixth floor of the TSBDB fired a rifle at the Presidential limousine that Friday noon. The fact that a third man, besides President Kennedy and Governor Connally, was a casualty of those crucial seconds forces us to ask, however, whether there was not one or more other riflemen firing at the motorcade from a different direction.

For James Thomas Tague stopped on Commerce Street near the Triple Underpass and was standing about 270 feet to the left of the President's car when he felt a sharp sting on his cheek. A deputy sheriff nearby, seeing blood on Tague's cheek, searched the immediate area and found a fresh bullet mark on the south curb of Main Street a few feet away. Tague was hit during the very seconds that he witnessed the murder of the President.

It is difficult to conceive of a sharpshooter aiming at the President from the TSBDB on Elm Street and striking so far afield of his target. It is highly possible, though, that the bullet which hit Tague was fired from the area that Tague himself thought was the source of fire: the grassy knoll on the north side of Elm Street. A marksman stationed there need not have taken faulty aim to miss the President and hit Tague.


Harold Feldman Reappointed as Editor-in-Chief of the National Kidney Foundation’s AJKD

September 30, 2020, New York, NY —The National Kidney Foundation has reappointed Harold (Harv) Feldman for a second term as Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases (AJKD), the foundation’s premier biomedical journal.

Founded in 1981, AJKD is recognized worldwide as a leading source of information devoted to clinical research and the practice of nephrology.

“It has been an honor to lead AJKD over the past several years,” Dr. Feldman said. “I am delighted to be continuing the work my extraordinarily capable editorial team. I began in 2016, bringing the highest-quality clinical scholarship and educational content to the research and clinical care communities.”

During his second term, which officially begins in January 2022, Dr. Feldman and his editorial team will further expand the journal’s emphasis on early career researchers, broaden approaches to disseminate authors’ works, offer more focused article types enriching the journal’s content, expand its patient-centered focus, and implement practices that increase diversity in our editorial team and expand scientific content about the negative influence of structural bias on kidney health.

“Since its inception, AJKD has been nurtured by a succession of distinguished nephrologists, as a forum and a resource for advancing research in the field,” said Kerry Willis, PhD, NKF’s Chief Scientific Officer. “Under Dr. Feldman’s creative leadership, AJKD has seen continued growth in the breadth and the quality of its content, and its international reach. NKF is grateful for his dedication to bringing the best research to the nephrology community, on behalf of our patients.”

Dr. Feldman is the George S. Pepper Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, a Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Medicine (Renal Electrolyte and Hypertension Division), and Medicine in Pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania where he also directs the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (CCEB). He also served in the role of Chair of Penn’s Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics between 2012 and 2019.

Dr. Feldman earned his MD in 1982 from Boston University before completing a residency in Internal Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. He completed his fellowship training in nephrology at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also completed graduate training in clinical epidemiology. He is a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, and the American Epidemiological Society. He is past president of the American College of Epidemiology.

Among his national leadership roles, Dr. Feldman has led the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study (CRIC) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for 20 years. It is the major national research effort aimed at making fundamental insights into the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of chronic kidney disease. Under his leadership, the CRIC Study has made numerous observations with great promise to advance the development of novel therapies to reduce morbidity in this population worldwide. Dr. Feldman’s published scholarship of more than 300 research publications has appeared in many leading biomedical journals including AJKD.

Kidney Disease Facts

In the United States, 37 million adults are estimated to have chronic kidney disease—and approximately 90 percent don’t know they have it. 1 in 3 adults in the U.S. are at risk for chronic kidney disease. Risk factors for kidney disease include: diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and family history. People of Black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian American, or Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander descent are at increased risk for developing the disease. Blacks or African Americans are almost 4 times more likely than White Americans to have kidney failure. Hispanics are 1.3 times more likely than non-Hispanics to have kidney failure.

NKF Professional Membership

Healthcare professionals can join NKF to receive access to tools and resources both patients and professionals, discounts on professional education, and access to a network of thousands of individuals who treat patients with kidney disease.

About the National Kidney Foundation

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is the largest, most comprehensive, and longstanding patient-centric organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention, and treatment of kidney disease in the U.S. For more information about NKF, visit www.kidney.org .

About the American Journal of Kidney Diseases

The American Journal of Kidney Diseases ( AJKD ), the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation, is recognized worldwide as a leading source of information devoted to clinical nephrology practice and clinical research. Articles selected for publication in AJKD undergo a rigorous consideration process, supporting the journal's goal to communicate important new information in clinical nephrology in a way that strengthens knowledge and helps physicians to provide their patients with the highest standard of care.


Feldman was born into the insular religious Satmar sect of Hasidic Judaism in Brooklyn where the primary language is Yiddish. The community maintains a code of customs governing everything from what one can wear, what is permissible to read, and to whom one can speak.

Feldman's spark of rebellion started with sneaking off to the library and hiding books written in English. At 17, she entered into an arranged marriage with a virtual stranger. Feldman said she had been denied sex education, was trapped in a sexually and emotionally dysfunctional marriage, and the failure to produce a child dominated her life. After finally getting pregnant, she realized she wanted something more for her child, and planned an escape from the community. [1] [2]

Publishers Weekly called the book an "engaging and at times gripping insight into Brooklyn's Hasidic community". [1]

Lisa Bonos of The Washington Post wrote that "Feldman seems to render this secretive community authentically I only wish she'd spent a bit more time editing herself. The lopsided book traverses her childhood in painstaking detail, which is often redundant and overwrought. I certainly understood that Feldman wanted more out of life but in the end, I wanted more from her narration. How did she handle such a tough transition, raising a child while attending college at Sarah Lawrence? She spends so much time on the world she left—without much exploration of where she's ended up." [3]

The Jewish Book Council reviewed the book, saying: "In the Satmar world, what Feldman did was scandalous, but her story didn't provide the drama and intrigue it seemed to have promised. However, it does provide a window into a world not many of us know about or can fathom. Her story, slow at first, invites us into the homes and mindsets of the Satmar people, at times wholesome and warm, and at others lonely, shocking, and disturbing. Feldman is reflective, never mincing words, saying exactly how she feels about everything. For a woman with little formal secular education, her writing is eloquent and stirring." [4]

The New York Jewish Week reported that the book "spurred a cottage industry devoted to dispelling its inaccuracies". [5]

The Huffington Post published a pair of articles reviewing the book and discussing the controversy surrounding it in the author's former community, concluding: "No doubt girls all over Brooklyn are buying this book, hiding it under their mattresses, reading it after lights out—and contemplating, perhaps for the first time, their own escape." [6] [7]

The 2020 Netflix original miniseries, Unorthodox, is loosely based on this book. [8] Netflix also produced a documentary, Making Unorthodox, that chronicles the creative process and filming, and discusses the differences between the book and the series. [9]

After leaving the Hasidic community, Deborah Feldman started blogging, and in 2012, she published her autobiography, Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots. In 2014, she moved to Berlin, continued to work as a writer, [10] and published Exodus: A Memoir. [10] [11] Both books have been translated into German, and were well received by critics, which led to her appearing on various talk shows on German TV. [12] [13]

Feldman is featured in the 2018 Swiss-German documentary #Female Pleasure. [14]


[The Nation Clipping - Harold Feldman Article, January 27, 1964]

Photocopy of magazine article from "The Nation" titled: "Oswald and the FBI." The article was written by Harold Feldman.

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[Magazine article by Harold Feldman]

Magazine article by Harold Feldman from "The Nation", entitled "Oswald and the FBI".

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This legal document is part of the collection entitled: John F. Kennedy, Dallas Police Department Collection and was provided by the Dallas Municipal Archives to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 93 times. More information about this document can be viewed below.

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Check out our Resources for Educators Site! We've identified this legal document as a primary source within our collections. Researchers, educators, and students may find this document useful in their work.

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Since 1985, the Archives have kept more than 2,000 cubic feet of materials open to the public by appointment. These materials include departmental documents, manuscripts, maps, photographs, and much more they document historical events like the Kennedy assassination and Clyde Barrow gang's activities.


Harold I. Feldman, MD, MSCE

Dr. Feldman’s academic leadership focuses on new thinking and novel approaches to understanding health and disease. He currently directs the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, where experts from all across the Perelman School of Medicine gather to investigate a broad array of population-health-science questions related to clinical medicine.

His key research addresses the epidemiology of kidney diseases—particularly, disease management from chronic kidney dysfunction to end stage—and he leads several related, major national clinical research networks of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease (NIDDK). He is the national study chair of the National Institutes of Health’s Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study (CRIC)—NIH’s largest-ever follow-up study of chronic kidney disease, its causes and consequences—which is making fundamental insights into the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of chronic kidney disease. As CRIC’s national study chair, he also leads its scientific and data coordinating center located at Penn. Under his leadership, CRIC has brought forward many findings that promise to advance novel therapies to lessen worldwide the morbidity and rate of death due to kidney disease those published by Dr. Feldman include seminal findings on the influence of mineral dysmetabolism on mortality and cardiovascular disease, and on the genetics of kidney disease progression. Dr. Feldman also leads NIDDK’s Hemodialysis Fistula Maturation Cohort Study and the coordinating center of its Chronic Kidney Disease Biomarkers Consortium. He directs several institutional training grants, funded by the National Institutes of Health, which focus on the clinical epidemiology of kidney disease, cancer and neurological disorders.

Dr. Feldman is the editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases and the past president of the American College of Epidemiology. His published scholarship—more than 200 research publications—has appeared in many leading biomedical journals. His work has also been recognized through membership in the American Society of Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, and the American Epidemiological Society.

He completed a residency in internal medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a fellowship in nephrology at the University of Pennsylvania.


Top scientist to rebuild UCSD Alzheimer’s program

UC San Diego has recruited a prominent Canadian neurologist to rebuild and lead a major Alzheimer’s disease research program that was gutted last year by the University of Southern California during a controversial takeover attempt.

Dr. Howard Feldman comes to La Jolla from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, where he achieved international acclaim for his examination of dementia and for carrying out large-scale drug trials. A science journal nicknamed him the “master of dementia.” He’s also known as a rainmaker for his ability to raise money for research.

Feldman, 61, is receiving a recruitment package that includes $10 million to set up his laboratory and support his research program. His annual salary is $390,000.

“Howard is a practicing neurologist whose life revolves around taking care of patients and developing world-class clinical trials,” said David Brenner, UC San Diego’s vice chancellor of health sciences and dean of its medical school. “He’s also very compassionate. He’s the right person to lead the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study.”

The study is actually a program in which UC San Diego oversees funding, manages data and handles other aspects of numerous studies conducted with partners such as other schools, pharmaceutical companies and federal agencies.

Feldman said he took the new job because “it is a very unique and exciting environment in which one gets to build on a legacy . I have worked with [the Alzheimer’s program] on some trials and admire the effectiveness of the network and my colleagues in it.”

UC San Diego started the program in 1991 to study Alzheimer’s disease and pursue therapies. At one point, it managed more than $100 million in funding from the government, private donors and drug makers most of the money was distributed to the participating study sites.

Feldman’s predecessor in the program was Dr. Paul Aisen, who quit last June to manage a new Alzheimer’s research institute that USC created in Sorrento Valley. Aisen said he left largely because UC San Diego didn’t provide enough financial support and staffing, a claim the university denies.

When Aisen departed, he took control of the program’s computer system, saying the data and other assets were effectively his under the long-standing custom of faculty members transferring their research work to their new employer. UC San Diego sued Aisen, some of his co-workers and USC in San Diego Superior Court, saying the university, not any particular researcher, owns the program.

UC San Diego officials said they can now see the program’s data, but still can’t manage it. The legal dispute has been moved to federal court, where a judge is scheduled to review the case Tuesday.

In the meantime, USC siphoned off eight of the program’s 10 largest research contracts, costing UC San Diego as much as $93.5 million. The raid represents one of the largest financial setbacks in UC San Diego history.

Brenner has been vocal about the conflict.

He has characterized USC leaders as academic carpetbaggers trying to improve their school’s reputation in science by trying to buy, acquire or partner with research centers in San Diego County.

Brenner also has acknowledged that the university failed to regularly review the Alzheimer’s project and that the program was allowed to become isolated from campus life.

And he said UC San Diego long ago failed to create a succession plan for the program, in case something unexpected happened to Aisen. The program was originally created by Leon Thal, a UC San Diego researcher who died in a plane crash in 2007. Aisen was brought in to replace him.

This week, Brenner downplayed the dispute with USC, emphasizing that “new vision, new leadership and new resources” are required to rebuild the Alzheimer’s program at UC San Diego. But he was still frustrated by the whole conflict and said the USC Alzheimer’s institute operates out of a “garage.”

In an email, Aisen said: “The USC Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute occupies the third floor (about 25,000 square feet) of an office building in Sorrento Valley. At present, about 60 people are working (there). Our work is going very well, including the studies that moved over to us from UCSD, as well as two new studies.”

Feldman, who is scheduled to assume his new position in April, is one of the most respected figures in the international community of scientists trying to decipher the nature of Alzheimer’s, which currently afflicts about 5.3 million people in the United States but is expected to affect far more as the population ages.

Thomson Reuters, the global information company, said Feldman was among the most influential minds in science from 2002-12, and among the most highly cited researchers in his field during the same period.

He has spent most of his career at the University of British Columbia, a large public research school. Feldman is a physician-scientist who conducts research and designs and carries out clinical trials. He has worked with dozens of pharmaceutical companies in fact, he left academia for two years in 2009 to work as a research executive for Bristol-Myers Squibb. During that stint, he focused on developing drugs for a variety of illnesses, from Alzheimer’s and autism to depression and migraines.

Feldman’s new appointment was praised by Dr. Perry Nisen, chief executive of the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in La Jolla.

“Dr. Feldman brings a wealth of experience in epidemiology, biomarker development and experimental therapeutics in dementia,” Nisen said. “We look forward to building meaningful collaborations with Dr. Feldman and UC San Diego to advance the science that will improve the lives of patients and their families.”

Feldman said he’s aware of the political upheaval involving the Alzheimer’s program at UC San Diego but isn’t deterred by it. “I don’t doubt that there are short-term challenges to address and resolve, but I think in the longer term, there’s an opportunity to create a new generation for [the program] and achieve excellence.”

Feldman said he’s most concerned about the state of Alzheimer’s research, noting: “I think that our progress has been slower than we had hoped for. Alzheimer’s disease is more complicated than we may have appreciated over the past 2.5 decades. . This is an urgent health problem that is looming.”


Heinrich Feldman was born in November 1935. [3]

As of 2015, Feldman had wealth of £100–360 million. [1]

Companies founded and owned Edit

Inremco 26 Edit

Inremco 26 [1] is among the London-based property redevelopment and holding companies Feldman founded in 1983. [4]

In its financial year 2012–13, it had assets of £107,000,000. [1] The company bought 1 Poultry, in the City of London, for two million less than this sum in December 2010. [2] [5] The company sold the large block for a gross gain of £5 million to private equity firm Perella Weinberg Partners in 2014. [5] [1]

Wade Properties Edit

Wade Properties is Feldman's company having the same purposes based in Israel. [6]

Family trustee Edit

Feldman is main donor and indirect trustee of the Mazal Brocha Trust, belonging to his descendants, managed by Bank Leumi Overseas Trust Corporation, a Jersey company. [6] In 2013, he directed the Corporation sue its lawyers as to the mechanism used for certain Israeli property investments. [6]


James Feldman

On this day, James Feldman and his students will climb atop Winnebago County’s tallest peak. It isn’t too windy it’s also not too hot. The students may not appreciate those weather details yet, but Feldman knows, they soon will.

On this day, Feldman is teaching his students a lesson that cannot be replicated in the classroom. He has taken his Campus Sustainability class to the Winnebago County Landfill. “There is no more tangible way to understand the problems that we have with waste management, and the problems that we have with over-consumption than by standing at the top of highest point of Winnebago County,” says Feldman, an associate professor of Environmental Studies and History at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. “This is the tangible place to experience what it means to consume like an American.”

At the base of the landfill, the students pile into two vans to follow a waste management worker in a pickup truck up and up the mountain of trash, which measures about 135 feet high or as tall as a 12-story building. When they get to the peak, the students, usually a chatty bunch, stand silent, taking in the sight before them—trash and more trash. The lunar-like landscape made up of monochromatic specks of brown stretches across the horizon. Flocks of seagulls search for food among giant bulldozers compressing the ever-growing amount of waste.
Students’ reactions vary from those who turn green, repulsed and unable to stand the stench to those who are excited to how trash is converted into methane gas. But the overall message is clear: The residents of Winnebago County produce a lot of trash.
“Standing on a mountain of trash and seeing all the junk that’s there and smelling the junk, it’s such a powerful experience,” Feldman says. “It’s really an instructive way to spend a class period.”
Since 2004, Feldman has been teaching students to think critically about complex problems that face the world. He is a charter member of the Campus Sustainability Council and co-author of the Campus Sustainability Plan, a comprehensive plan to guide the University’s sustainability initiatives. He is also a 2011 Edward M. Penson Distinguished Teaching Award winner and the author of A Storied Wilderness: The Rewilding the Apostle Islands, which was released in spring of 2011. For the school year 2011-2012, Feldman is on sabbatical, conducting research on his next project—the history and sustainability of radioactive waste management.

History and the Great Outdoors

Born to an attorney and a social worker, Feldman always had an affinity for history and nature. He never lacked ideas for grade school essays because he could always find something to write about relating to either topic. His love for the good earth and all her stories was further cemented when he went to Camp Nebagamon in Northern Wisconsin as a youth. “We would go canoeing and hiking,” he recalls. “I just loved those kinds of trips.”

In this podcast, Dr. James Feldman talks about his book titled "A Storied Wilderness: The Rewilding the Apostle Islands." Produced by Jay Vickery.

While majoring in history at Amherst College in Massachusetts, Feldman returned to Camp Nebagamon every summer as a wilderness trip leader. It was that point he realized he could turn his passion for nature and history into a career. Feldman went to graduate school and earned his master’s degree in history at Utah State. After being awarded a Fulbright Scholarship in 1996, he spent 15 months in New Zealand studying environmental history and politics of the island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. His work not only dealt with environmental policy but historical questions as to how a treaty from1840 (Treaty of Waitangi) still affects New Zealand’s indigenous people today. It was in New Zealand that Feldman discovered how he could turn his interest in nature and history into social action. “The work that I did there really convinced me that there was a way to make historical research applicable to modern issues,” says Feldman, who earned his doctorate in American history from UW-Madison.

Lessons from the Past

Students, Feldman says, must study what has transpired to understand what is happening now to the environment. “Students come into the classroom assuming that history is history and doesn’t matter today,” he says.
The students soon learn how wrong their perceptions are. “We are today still wrestling with the same kinds of issues that people wrestled with 20, 50, 80 or 100 or 200 years ago,” Feldman says, adding that in his Environmental History class he challenges his students to look at landscape and cities from a historical perspective. “Why are cities set up the way that they are? Why are streets laid out the way they are?”
Critical examination on the students’ part may lead them to think about how to address current environmental issues. Kaci Worth, an environmental studies major with a minor in history, credits Feldman for making her aware about how the way she lives her life could have great consequences. “Jim stresses the importance of being an involved citizen and makes you think about how your actions impact the world in ways more complex and far-reaching than one would originally imagine,” she says.

Student Kyle Sandmire was so taken by Feldman’s History of the American Wilderness class that he plans to attend graduate school to further his environmental studies. “From Dr. Feldman’s class I learned how to critically analyze historical texts as well as finding connections between wilderness conservation efforts in the past as well present,” he says. “Dr. Feldman inspired me to always take a deeper look into any written claim to best develop my own opinion.”

Feldman thrives on that kind of student feedback. “One of the most exciting things about being a teacher is when you can see that your students are having that kind of A-ha! moment where they are getting it, where they are starting to look at things in a new way because of the things they are learning,” he says. “When I think about what I want my students to take out of my classes, it’s less about specific names and dates and places and much more about the big picture. There are huge problems out there that need to be solved—global warming, industrial agriculture, over-consumption and so on.”

Quite simply, Feldman would like his students to think critically, to see relationships among complicated issues. “If we can teach our students to think about how their own behavior and the behavior of their communities, their states, and their countries are fitting into the bigger picture, then we have started down the path toward change, change that will really make a difference,” he says. “We have started down the path toward sustainability.”

More than Being Green

For Feldman, sustainability means a lot more than simply being green or caring about nature. “Being sustainable means recognizing the interconnections between our environmental, social, and economic systems,” he says. “You don’t go to college to learn prescriptive behavior like ‘you should recycle more’ or ‘you should buy organic food.’ Sustainability needs to mean something more. To be sustainable, we need to learn to act in ways that are not just environmental responsible, but also in ways that make our communities socially just and economically secure.”

To that end, Feldman has been a driving force in helping the University be as sustainable as possible. Since 2008, he has co-led three Winnebago Sustainability Projects, which are faculty development workshops to coach colleagues on infusing the concept of sustainability in their courses.

In April 2011, The Princeton Review listed UW Oshkosh, for the second year in a row, in its “Guide to 311 Green Colleges,” a spotlight of colleges and universities in the United States and Canada “that demonstrate a strong commitment to sustainability in their academic offerings, campus infrastructure, activities, and career preparation.”
“I think there is no question we are the leader in the UW System,” Feldman says of the University’s sustainability initiatives. “I think we are one of the leaders in the country in the sense of the kind of school that we are.”
Though Feldman is passionate about sustainability, he is quick to point out his own shortcomings. “It’s easy to walk around and see examples of unsustainable behavior and bad behavior relative to the environment,” he says, adding, “but I have too many things that I have to change about myself for me to start getting judgmental about anybody else.”
One thing Feldman has to contend with is his commute to Oshkosh from his home in Madison where he lives with his wife Chris Taylor, who is an Assemblywoman for the 48th district, and their two young sons, Sam and Ben. “I have a long drive to work and emit carbon to go teach about global warming,” he says wryly. “Until I become perfect, I’m going to keep my soapbox pretty small.”

Raising Hope

Feldman knows he risks leaving his students feeling powerless when confronted with society’s environmental ills. “These are stories about how we have taken this beautiful natural world and just driven it into the ground,” he says. “That’s a bear to teach, and it’s a bear to learn and you can see the students sometimes just getting beaten down.”
Feldman, however, helps his students combat that bleakness with ideas for social action. “I always like to end my classes with at least some discussion about what you can do or what needs to change,” he says.
Feldman, too, is doing his part to make the world a better sustainable place every time he steps into a classroom. “I have a chance to make a difference and the most direct way that I feel like I can do that is through my teaching.”

Student reporters Hannah Becker and Nate Cate also contributed to this report.


Douglas Feldman, former financial analyst, executed in Texas for 1998 road-rage killings

Douglas Feldman, who was executed by the state of Texas on Wednesday, July 31, 2013. CBS Dallas

(CBS/AP) HUNTSVILLE, Texas - A former financial analyst with a history of disruptive behavior was executed Wednesday for the shooting deaths of two truckers in the Dallas area 15 years ago.

Douglas Feldman, 55, received a lethal injection for gunning down Robert Everett, 36, of Missouri and Nicholas Valesquez, 62, of Texas.

Feldman mimicked the announcement a judge or jury makes when announcing a verdict, using the names of his victims and declaring he had found them guilty of crimes against him.

Trending News

"I have sentenced them both to death. I personally carried out their executions," he said in a loud voice, adding that he carried out their executions in August 1998.

"As of that time, the state of Texas has been holding me illegally in confinement and by force for 15 years," Feldman said. "I hereby protest my pending execution and demand immediate relief."

He appeared very nervous, breathing quickly and his feet twitching under a sheet. As the drug began taking effect, he grimaced twice, took a few deep breaths and began snoring. Then all movement stopped.

Feldman was pronounced dead 13 minutes after the lethal drug was injected at 6:28 p.m. local time.

Feldman's attorney, Robin Norris, filed a clemency petition with the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles that was turned down Monday. Multiple courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, earlier rejected appeals on Feldman's behalf.

Feldman, from Richardson, was riding his motorcycle the night of Aug. 24, 1998, and said Everett, driving an 18-wheeler, cut him off on a Dallas County freeway so he took out his 9 mm pistol, pulled up alongside the truck cab and shot him. Feldman testified at his capital murder trial that he was still angry about 45 minutes later when he spotted Valesquez, a gasoline tanker driver filling a Dallas service station, and shot him.

"A security camera catches him shooting the man in cold blood," Jason January, the former Dallas County assistant district attorney who prosecuted him, said. "Several counties were frightened as this unidentified motorcyclist was out acting like 'The Terminator.'"

Feldman was arrested more than a week later, after shooting and wounding a man at a fast-food restaurant and driving off. A bystander saw the shooting and reported his license plate number to police, who tracked him down and found Feldman with two pistols and nearly 300 rounds of ammunition. Ballistics tests confirmed one of the guns was used in all three shootings.

"It feels wonderful to cause their death and to watch their pain," he said in one of 81 letters he wrote to a former girlfriend while awaiting his trial. The writings from the magna cum laude Southern Methodist University graduate were introduced into evidence.

"God forbid I ever had my finger on the button to launch a nuclear explosive device because I guarantee that I would wipe as many of these bastards off the face of the planet as I am able!" he said in another letter.

Without remorse, he also acknowledged the killings while testifying at his capital murder trial.

Feldman became the 11th prisoner executed this year in Texas and third this month. At least seven other inmates are scheduled to die in the coming months in the nation's busiest capital punishment state


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